You’ve Reached Your Goal: Digital Citizenship in Health/Wellness

I have recently been exploring the idea of using technology in my Health and Wellness classes to promote a healthy lifestyle.  The idea is to explore apps that would allow integration of Health and Wellness concepts into class structure and into the students own personal lives.  The end goal being to evaluate these apps for their effectiveness.  I plan to evaluate tools that touch on the areas of evaluation, physical activity, health and safety, class management and goal setting to name a few.  I also wished to explore the link between Digital Citizenship and the promotion of wellness through the use of technology.  Mike Ribble identifies 9 elements of digital citizenship which can be viewed as norms for behavior with regard to technology use.  In this work Ribble describes these 9 elements as follows;

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In the exploration of these elements I was at first struck by the fact that my chosen area of study seemed to only touch on the area of digital health and wellness.  In many mays this is true however, it is somewhat simplistic to think that just because I am exploring health and wellness topics, I will not be implicating other elements.  Indeed it has been apparent in recent years that screen time among children and teens has risen drastically, often replacing physical activity and leading to increased levels of obesity according to Boone and Gordon.   However, after further examination, a focus on health and wellness in a digital age could provide opportunities for other elements to explored as well.  These could include but are not limited to; digital communication, digital etiquette,  digital security and digital literacy.  It is clear that that any inclusion of technology in any area of the curriculum must also offer a valid discussion of digital identity.  As Wesitheimer and Kahne discuss in their work, the examination of digital citizenship merits a closer look at what types of citizens we want students to be online.  Whether promoting personally responsible citizens, participatory citizens or justice oriented citizens, it is crucial to include discussion of digital identity and what implications health and wellness apps have for identity online.  The recent debacle with Strava and their heat map has proven that releasing fitness information to the world can have consequences.

Teaching students to be conscious of what fitness/health data is published for others to see is an exercise in digital security.   Students’ health information and data should be carefully considered when being shared.  In addition, many of these apps contain social media features and the ability to contact and connect with others.  These exchanges of information between peers and also between companies constitutes the same need for digital etiquette in regards to the publication of information.  It’s clear that any examination or inclusion of wellness/fitness apps must also provide for students an open discussion around identity questions and privacy rights.  As Talitha Williams points out in the following TEDTalk, data generated from Health/Fitness apps can have a tremendous impact on our general health.  However, the elements of etiquette, communication, security, and literacy are all valid parts of this ongoing discussion.

As Homayoun discusses in her article, the dangers of getting caught in a feedback loop mean that teenagers are not always cognizant of what they should or should not be posting online.  In many ways wellness and mindfulness apps would offer a sharp contrast to the constant need to post and share new content.  Many new apps like SmilingMind are geared toward helping teens and adults find balance in their lives via a serious of meditation and calming reminders.  The temptation with fitness apps is very similar to other social media apps in that many are based on comparisons with others, thereby increasing the need to outperform others.  As is notable with the current rise in sales of wearable technology, the more we compare ourselves with what others are posting, the more we are motivated to continue to post our athletic achievements online as well.

  As I continue to explore the world of health/wellness apps, it will be crucial to, as Costa and Tores state,

“establish a reputable digital identity which students can looks up to and follow as example.”

In closing I believe that this project touches most significantly on the elements of security, health and wellness, communication, etiquette and communication.  It is in each of these areas that proper use of technology to enhance physical and mental health must be modelled.  Topics of identity and and presentation of self online should be explored in detail and students should be encouraged to live “non-linear lives” as Brown puts it.  As far as next steps are concerned for the project.   I will be finalizing the suite of apps to explore and beginning to use them myself as well as introducing them to my students.  A series of videos/blogposts will allow me to evaluate the apps and their perceived effectiveness in the area of health/wellness.

 

 

 

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Is it Meaningful?: Blending Assessment and Technology

assessment-icon-tab-340x340The marriage of assessment and technology has not been an easy one in many respects.  Documenting, assessing and tracking student learning has been done on paper for many years and even by me in my first few years of teaching.  (No, I’m not that old).  I used to type up my report cards as word documents and print them out for parents.  As technology improved in the world of assessment, many wondered how student records could be kept in digital formats securely.  In recent years teachers have been turning to technology to aid in providing meaningful feedback to enhance learning.  As Logan points out, why has assessment remained the one area in which technology has yet to be well utilized for many teachers?  One of the tools that I enjoy using for formative assessment is exit tickets that can be automatically graphed and analyzed to tell me which students have understood the content and which ones have not.  This information can be collected in a variety of ways. Photo Credit

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One simple way is to send out a Google Form.  Formative assessment can easily be achieved using non-tech methods such as exit slips, thumbs up`or thumbs down, think/pair/share, etc.  However, for many of the students in our division this makes the most sense because they all have a full GAFE suit.  The data is then sent into a google sheet for you or it can be graphed to show you what percent of your class understood the concept for that lesson.  Another tool I have used in the past is Padlet.  This tool allows students to populate a page with their responses to a question.  The responses can be arranged in various ways and it produces a quick visual to allow a check for understanding.  Because our students all participate in BYOD, I have not had a chance to try Plickers but the idea intrigues me.  It sounds like it would be ideal in a situation where students do not have their own devices.  Mentimeter and Polleverywhere are tools that can be used for even more immediate formative assessment and feedback as results can be displayed via projector in word clouds or by most used phrase.  This way, student feedback can be immediately provided verbally.  These are some of the formative assessment tools I plan to implement to a greater extent in my Math and Health classes.

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Of course for the more summative pieces of work we must use tools that are consistent, measurable and testable.  Rubrics are one way to ensure that students work is assessed fairly and accurately against the outcomes being measured.  However, creating rubrics can be a daunting task.  From deciding on wording to how many marks to offer per category it can often be the task that requires the most time.  Assessing final pieces of student work can be even more difficult.  EdTEchTeacher has gathered a tidy group of rubric generators, tutorials, and samples.  These samples include rubrics for evaluating, wikis, graphic organizers, coding, podcasts, videos, digital story telling projects, websites/digital portfolios and even social media.  I plan to use these tools to hopefully increase the efficacy of my summative assessment techniques when I have students completing digital projects.  Attaching rubrics to each outcome measured and making these outcomes clear to students is one of the best ways to improve student learning.  It’s very easy to be caught up in the hype of a new piece of tech to have students demonstrate their learning but without the tools to assess these projects they may be deprived of meaning.

In the above video, several assessment tools are highlighted as being beneficial to the learning process.  I would agree with Mackenzie Zoner in that the use of technology in the assessment framework provides faster feedback and therefore higher value instruction and learning.  What does this look like in Phys Ed or Wellness?  As @PENathan has demonstrated, there are many useful tech tools that can play a major role in assessment in a Phys Ed or Wellness class.  In his blog, he describes an app smash project that sounds like a lot of fun.  In essence he had his students use GIFO to create a Gif of an exercise routine and then upload it to Google Slides to present their workout videos to the class.  @JoeyFeith aka The Physical Educator uses Giphy to create looping skills videos to showcase new skills to students and help them practice.

I think this way of melding physical activity and technology is a great idea and a huge motivator for kids to take pride in their physical and mental accomplishments.  These types of video tools could be very useful in solidifying movement techniques or sport skills.  Even apps like Coach’s Eye or IDoceo could play a key role in providing meaningful feedback to students about skills being acquired or how to improve their technique.

As has been mentioned before during this course, it can be extremely overwhelming trying to implement new technology in the classroom.  Therefore, my goal for these next few weeks is to use Gifs in some way to either assess or analyze student progress with a movement skill as well as being more purposeful in creating meaningful rubrics in digital format that can be attached in Google Classroom.  Finally, I hope to use formative assessment tools such as Google Forms or Padlet to inform instruction in Math and Health.  Once again it is paramount that learning outcomes be accompanied by meaningful feedback as soon as possible after the assessment has taken place.  Technology can play a significant role in this but as Andrew pointed out, it may not necessarily replace building relationships with students.  Sometimes, conversations or verbal interactions are a key component in solidifying learning.  Meaningful conversation may not ever be replaceable by technology.  Do you agree?  Let me know your thoughts in the comments section below.