Mirror Mirror on the Wall: What’s your Digital Reflection?

How do you define yourself?  Digital identity can be described as the digital representation of a physical entity.  This could be a person, an organization or even a school district for example.  In today’s world of new and emerging technologies, managing one’s identity online has become a crucial and necessary skill to have.  Some have argued that digital duality does not exist in the strict sense and that there is no true demarcation line between a digital self and a real-world self.  Others agree that digital identities are simply a reflection of what we choose to show in the mirror.  In other words, we can choose to reflect our true nature or, for some, the choice exists to portray a totally new persona online.  It has often been described as a footprint, a tattoo or a reflection but no matter the metaphor, it has become apparent that having an online presence is the way the world has moved.  As Dr. Alec Couros describes below, having control over our identity online is not always easy when we consider the apps, websites, and companies that house much of our data.  In essence, how do we allow students to experiment with their digital identities in a responsible way that fosters connection and collaboration?

One of the more profound ways to help students in this manner is through leading by example.  When I think back to when I first started building my digital identity, it probably was nothing more than a Facebook page and maybe a few images on a google search.  Now, however, there is a whole host of apps and websites that own my data.  Although this may not be troubling for some, the fact of the matter is that in examination of the terms of use of many of these apps we find that any data uploaded to these websites ceases to be our own property and can be reused without permission.  For most in today’s society, this makes little difference in their day to day lives.  However, in my opinion, it will become evident in the coming years that prudence with what is posted online will be a valuable skill.  In reading Jaque’s blog post on this topic it became clear that I am not the only one who has become more rigid in deciding what to share online.  It seems as though increasingly there is little to no filtering being done before photos are shared or live streams started.  In France there are even new regulations to discourage parents from sharing photos of their children without discretion.

As I have built my digital identity, I have moved away from the constant uploading of personal data and have started to manage who has access to my personal photos and information.  Certain platforms are used strictly for professional posts such as this blog, Twitter, and Youtube for example.  I have tried to curate a profile and identity that would reflect positively at all times on myself, my family, and my profession.  This is what is at the crux of the argument for more inclusion of digital citizenship lessons in schools.  The importance for the future of our students and our society con not be understated.

In examining digital identity, it is imperative that we understand that it is not simply about safeguarding kids against possible dangers online.  It has to be about more than that.  It’s important that students also realize that managing your digital identity is based in positive interactions online.  As Kristin Hicks states in her post,

“Teaching digital citizenship means embracing the reality that we’re all interconnected through the Internet, and that we therefore need to understand the responsibilities and risks that come with life online”

Many teachers in Saskatchewan are incorporating a classroom Twitter account into their everyday routines with students in order to reiterate the importance of and the knowledge to foster positive interactions online.  As Dani mentioned in her post, education is truly the key to ensuring students have the tools necessary to not only stay safe and protected online but to THRIVE online!  This means creating positive meaningful relationships with others.   Below is a great example of a 7/8 classroom here in Regina which uses Twitter to share learning and connect with other learners across the globe.

In reflecting on my own family, I hope to engage in meaningful and valuable conversations around digital identity with my own kids as they grow up.  I hope to continue using scrutiny when posting any pictures or video of my kids, knowing that this data is no longer my property or theirs.   I hope they grow up with teachers that teach and model appropriate use of technology to create positive connections with others.  As is stated in this article from the Atlantic, youth should have a moral responsibility to control their own digital footprint and sharenting has done much to circumvent this.  I hope my digital identity makes my kids proud and not embarrassed.  Finally, I hope that my kids rise to the challenge of creating and curating positive identities for themselves online.   The internet has the ability to bring out the best in people and also the worst in people and I hope for my kids it brings out the best.  Here are some tips for parents to help promote a positive digital identity with their kids via edmentum .  

  1. Only share personal information when necessary.
  2. Take advantage of Internet privacy settings.
  3. Remind your child to always think before typing.
  4. Manage online accounts and passwords closely

In the above video, kids share with their parents what they are really doing online.  As is stated in the video, this is the world our kids are growing up in.  Let’s be involved and learn together what it means to be a positive contributor to this online world.  Ultimately kids are always watching what we do so it is truly on our shoulders to model what this looks like for future generations.

Question to consider: In what ways do you already model positive digital behaviour for students or children?  Is it effective?

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You’ve Reached Your Goal: Digital Citizenship in Health/Wellness

I have recently been exploring the idea of using technology in my Health and Wellness classes to promote a healthy lifestyle.  The idea is to explore apps that would allow integration of Health and Wellness concepts into class structure and into the students own personal lives.  The end goal being to evaluate these apps for their effectiveness.  I plan to evaluate tools that touch on the areas of evaluation, physical activity, health and safety, class management and goal setting to name a few.  I also wished to explore the link between Digital Citizenship and the promotion of wellness through the use of technology.  Mike Ribble identifies 9 elements of digital citizenship which can be viewed as norms for behavior with regard to technology use.  In this work Ribble describes these 9 elements as follows;

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In the exploration of these elements I was at first struck by the fact that my chosen area of study seemed to only touch on the area of digital health and wellness.  In many mays this is true however, it is somewhat simplistic to think that just because I am exploring health and wellness topics, I will not be implicating other elements.  Indeed it has been apparent in recent years that screen time among children and teens has risen drastically, often replacing physical activity and leading to increased levels of obesity according to Boone and Gordon.   However, after further examination, a focus on health and wellness in a digital age could provide opportunities for other elements to explored as well.  These could include but are not limited to; digital communication, digital etiquette,  digital security and digital literacy.  It is clear that that any inclusion of technology in any area of the curriculum must also offer a valid discussion of digital identity.  As Wesitheimer and Kahne discuss in their work, the examination of digital citizenship merits a closer look at what types of citizens we want students to be online.  Whether promoting personally responsible citizens, participatory citizens or justice oriented citizens, it is crucial to include discussion of digital identity and what implications health and wellness apps have for identity online.  The recent debacle with Strava and their heat map has proven that releasing fitness information to the world can have consequences.

Teaching students to be conscious of what fitness/health data is published for others to see is an exercise in digital security.   Students’ health information and data should be carefully considered when being shared.  In addition, many of these apps contain social media features and the ability to contact and connect with others.  These exchanges of information between peers and also between companies constitutes the same need for digital etiquette in regards to the publication of information.  It’s clear that any examination or inclusion of wellness/fitness apps must also provide for students an open discussion around identity questions and privacy rights.  As Talitha Williams points out in the following TEDTalk, data generated from Health/Fitness apps can have a tremendous impact on our general health.  However, the elements of etiquette, communication, security, and literacy are all valid parts of this ongoing discussion.

As Homayoun discusses in her article, the dangers of getting caught in a feedback loop mean that teenagers are not always cognizant of what they should or should not be posting online.  In many ways wellness and mindfulness apps would offer a sharp contrast to the constant need to post and share new content.  Many new apps like SmilingMind are geared toward helping teens and adults find balance in their lives via a serious of meditation and calming reminders.  The temptation with fitness apps is very similar to other social media apps in that many are based on comparisons with others, thereby increasing the need to outperform others.  As is notable with the current rise in sales of wearable technology, the more we compare ourselves with what others are posting, the more we are motivated to continue to post our athletic achievements online as well.

  As I continue to explore the world of health/wellness apps, it will be crucial to, as Costa and Tores state,

“establish a reputable digital identity which students can looks up to and follow as example.”

In closing I believe that this project touches most significantly on the elements of security, health and wellness, communication, etiquette and communication.  It is in each of these areas that proper use of technology to enhance physical and mental health must be modelled.  Topics of identity and and presentation of self online should be explored in detail and students should be encouraged to live “non-linear lives” as Brown puts it.  As far as next steps are concerned for the project.   I will be finalizing the suite of apps to explore and beginning to use them myself as well as introducing them to my students.  A series of videos/blogposts will allow me to evaluate the apps and their perceived effectiveness in the area of health/wellness.

 

 

 

Gazing into the Future of Education

How do you prepare someone for something you can’t understand? Is it even possible?  The recent discussion in educational technology circles has centered on the fact that we do not know what the world will be like in even 5-10 years.  With the exponential increase in technological advancement, it is doubtful that the students graduating from our high schools or universities in 10 years will have any of the necessary skills to find employment or succeed if we continue to educate them for the 20th century.  It has been argued that instead of teaching a specific set of facts or knowledge, it will be increasingly important to focus on skills.  In his paper,  Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century, Henry Jenkins argues that there are new skills that will be of utmost importance for the next generation.  These are what he claims are the building blocks for successful education in for the future.

Play — the capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of problem-solving
Performance — the ability to adopt alternative identities for the purpose of improvisation and discovery
Simulation — the ability to interpret and construct dynamic models of real-world processes
Appropriation — the ability to meaningfully sample and remix media content
Multitasking — the ability to scan one’s environment and shift focus as needed to salient details.
Distributed Cognition — the ability to interact meaningfully with tools that expand mental capacities
Collective Intelligence — the ability to pool knowledge and compare notes with others toward a common goal
Judgment — the ability to evaluate the reliability and credibility of different information sources
Transmedia Navigation — the ability to follow the flow of stories and information across multiple modalities
Networking — the ability to search for, synthesize, and disseminate information
Negotiation — the ability to travel across diverse communities, discerning and respecting multiple perspectives, and grasping and following alternative norms.

Looking through this list it is perhaps glaringly obvious but, few if any of the outcomes of our current Saskatchewan Curriculum look even remotely like this.  It is interesting to consider the changes that have already occurred in our educational system over the last 50 years.  It’s true that we have seen the emergence of educational technologies that could not have been imagined 50 years ago.  From the internet to handheld devices, educational apps and realtime feedback, there is now a myriad of tools at the disposal of the 21st century educator.  However, there exists in our classrooms a resistance to the change in structure that has existed since the industrial revolution.  Other than a few forward thinkers, we still, for the most part, educate children in desks placed in rows with the teacher at the front of the classroom.  But what could education look like?

Robyn Shulman in her article on digital citizenship, discuses the fact that our students have a vast knowledge of the use and navigation of tools and online spaces but very little idea about how to “leverage technology for best outcomes.”  I tend to agree that the students of today’s generation have enormous potential at their fingertips but perhaps have not been given the tools to promote their digital wellness.  It will be ever more crucial in the coming years to expand our understanding of health and wellness to include digital hygiene as well.  As Alisa Sklar states,

Digital hygiene teaches so much more than just safe, responsible use of digital tools. A parent who sits down together with their child to Google how to configure Instagram privacy settings is also modelling critical thinking, research techniques, discussing context, and involving their child.

Parents and teachers alike must be confident in addressing digital concerns with students and youth if we are to give them a firm hold in a digital future.  Brittany raised a good point about the parallel between the current idea of citizenship in a real world context in comparison with the digital world.  Allowing students to learn and exhibit the same rights and responsibilities in both realms will be key in assuring that these youth become engaged, critical thinkers in online spaces.  Not only as passive consumers but as active participants who defend and advocate for the rights of others.

In addition, it has been suggested that the need for formal educational institutions may one day be no longer.  As Danielle pointed out in her recent post, this idea tends to make educators slightly uncomfortable.  Not only because it could mean the end of our jobs but also because as teachers, we have seen the value of critical thinking and face to face interaction that happens when students/teachers are engaged in the learning process.  On the other hand, as Jocelyn pointed out in her post,  the potential of tools like Google Classroom to help students move beyond a physical set of classroom walls is astounding.  In remote areas this is happening already with school divisions such as SunWest  right here in Saskatchewan.  In many ways the disintegration of physical classrooms spaces is already happening.  As teachers and students look ahead to the further convergence of education and technology, we must be prepared to look at what future students will appreciate in their learning environments.  It’s hard for me to believe that teachers will ever be taken completely out of the equation, however, educational landscapes are changing and will continue to do so.  So, here are some tips for teachers from actual students.

1. Make it about ME 🙇

2. Let’s DO things 👩‍🔬

3. Don’t ditch me in an online course 💻

4. Be my coach 👩‍🏫

5. Teach me relevant skills 🙇‍

6. Foster a growth mindset 📈

 

Techno Wars: A New Hope

I have always felt somewhat torn by discussions of the role of technology in society.  I think in large part this is due to my upbringing.  I lived in Mali, West Africa from the age of 3 to 16.  A country that was, and still is, one of the poorest in the world.  Many of the villages we lived in had no phone lines at all.  We would write letters, drive 2 hours on dirt donkey trails into the nearest town with a post office.  The letters would take about 2-3 months to reach Canada at which point the response would take 2-3 months to get back to us.  This disconnect meant that we were in many ways cut off from the world due to lack of infrastructure.

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When we returned to Canada in 2001, I had a lot of catching up to do.  I had missed roughly 10 years of my generations’ pop music (maybe that was a good thing), I didn’t get any of the pop culture references, and people that quoted Ace Ventura to me would be met with blank stares.  In the world of technology I was awkward at best.  I was able to type to some degree but as my peers explored MySpace and MSN Messenger it never quite took hold for me.  I often felt I was an alien visiting earth for the first time and I wasn’t sure where to start.  I slowly started making inroads into my lack of knowledge in these areas.  I watched the movies such as Star Wars that had been touted as classics by my friends and began exploring the online world.

When Facebook came on to the scene in 2004, I was drawn to it through nostalgia more than anything.  I discovered that I could reconnect with friends from half-way across the world.  I could view pictures from back in Mali and even carry on conversations with old friends.  From this point on, I truly began to feel much more engaged in Canadian culture because I was able to at once be in step with popular cultural acceptance of Social Media but at the same time keep connection to a part of me that I thought had been left on the other side of the ocean.  I would say this was definitely the beginning of my entrance into the realm of being a digital visitor.  Although Prensky’s notion of Immigrants vs Natives perhaps holds more initial connection to my situation from a geographical standpoint, I find it difficult to reconcile the notion that generational gaps alone account for feelings of technological competency.  For example, there are children between the ages of 5 and 15 growing up in third world countries right now who have limited or no access to the internet or social media.  Nor does it follow necessarily that 1st world teens born after a certain year will automatically possess an understanding of digital spaces as part of nativity.   As David White suggests,

   ‘the cultural effects of the social hyperconnectivity brought about by social media and mobile devices are often masked by shallow assessments of technological functionality and the apparent capability of specific groups in consuming ‘new’ technology.’- Citation

When I first began using Facebook, I felt as though I was and perhaps still am a visitor;  using online tools when necessary and then turning those tools off when they are no longer needed.  Even when it came to cell phones I held back for a relatively long time compared to others in my peer groups.  My first smart phone was the iphone 4 which was released in 2010.  Once again, it became a tool to use when I needed it.  A few years later, I began to research the world of #edtech and realized quickly that this would be the way education might evolve.  I started trying to incorporate technology into my teaching and learned as I made mistakes.  However, I was still a visitor.  My personal relationship with technology with regards to  the technological engagement continuum remains ambiguous.

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I use the tech tools that I find useful in my work and in my personal life and if I look at my phone or laptop and notice apps that I have not used in the last month, they are often deleted.  I am a fan of functionality and I love using technology when it engages students, enhances learning in some way or allows students to deepen their understanding.  However, it disheartens me to see technology enhance preexisting human conditions such as disunity, discord, jealousy, hatred, and disparity.  I wholeheartedly agree that technology, when it is used properly, has enormous potential to create social change, improve life for people on earth, and foster connection.  On the other hand it also has the potential to be used to devastating effect to inflict pain, divide instead of unite, and give voice to hatred.  Technology cannot be saviour nor can it be our doom, it must therefore be approached in a more realistic fashion.  Technology must not be analyzed in a vacuum.  It is born of man, born out of human social constructs.  Since I could not identify myself as a proponent of  techno-utopian ideas nor techno-dystopian ideas, I began exploring middle ground.

In reading Stephen Bernard’s Blog Post on Techno-Realism, I have found myself drawn to the idea that we must not simply blindly adopt Techno-Utopian or Techno-Dystopian theories without truly engaging in critical examination of the ways in which technology and social fabrics are intertwined.  Conversely we must realize that although technology has been the driving force behind human advancement, it does not leave us without options and does not exist separate from human interaction.  There must be a balance, in effect, between positive and negative in the techno-theory debate.  It allows for the ability of technology to affect positive change in the world while accepting that there are certain aspects of technology that have and will continue to affect humankind in a negative way.

“What can technorealism do for sociological inquiry?  Besides offering a healthy dose of reality, it can guide us beyond mere polemics and onto a plane of thought grounded in both logic and evidence”-Stephen Bernard

Here are some of the key principals of technorealism as espoused by technorealism.org

PRINCIPLES OF TECHNOREALISM

1. Technologies are not neutral.
2. The Internet is revolutionary, but not Utopian.
3. Government has an important role to play on the electronic frontier.
4. Information is not knowledge.
5. Wiring the schools will not save them.
6. Information wants to be protected.
7. The public owns the airwaves; the public should benefit from their use.
8. Understanding technology should be an essential component of global citizenship.

This idea seeks to be a neutral territory between positive and negative views of the role of technology although it lacks a certain element: HOPE!  What is human society without hope.  It is what drives to create, share, uplift and uphold one another.  It is hope that led to the great technological advancements of the 20th century and it is hope that inspires people all over the world to wake up and create change for the better.  For these reasons I find myself slowly moving from digital visitor to digital resident and from techno-realism to techno-progressivism.  Yes we must be critical of the ways in which technology is being used, however, if we are constantly looking over our shoulders for possible problems we will potentially miss out on greater opportunities for the good of mankind.  In a recent Globe and Mail Article, Jennifer Anikst explored the idea that millennials are pragmatic idealists.  Supposedly two very opposing theories are taken up simultaneously to allow this generation to solve social problems through the use of technology for social justice.  To me that spells hope for the future.

Assistive Technology: Putting A Stop To ‘Other’ing in Society

I have not had many experiences with assistive technology over the years but I will attempt to share my thoughts regarding the role of technology in levelling the playing field for students with disabilities or to enhance learning.  I have taught 2 students with hearing impairments over the years and they each required a microphone in order to hear what was going on in the classroom.  The 2 students approached this difficulty in differing ways however.  One student needed a sound system used in the classroom and thus students and teachers would talk into the microphone in order for her to hear.  The other student had a system that transmitted directly to his hearing aids and was therefore able to hear without the need for an amplifier.assistive-technology-1  It was interesting to see the other students’ reactions to the different systems.  In the first case, many of the students loved using the microphone for presentations and class discussions.  The microphone became similar to a talking stone that indicated when others should listen.  It became a bit more cumbersome at times but overall, it was a very positive experience.  I have also taught a student who had a personal laptop with Kursweil in order to help him take notes and complete assignments.  Students in all cases were very supportive and understanding.  I think one aspect that is often forgotten is the teaching around equity and what it means for student success.  I often hear the argument about fidgets from students that they believe it’s unfair if certain students receive special tools to use in class.  This is due to the fact that before any teaching is done on metacognition, students tend to see fidgets or even assistive technology as something that they should all have access to. When I first begin these conversations with Middle Years students I often give students a learning styles type of personal evaluation to start the conversation.  Then we talk about how each of us learns best.  Finally I have the kids do some writing about how they like to learn.  Photo Credit

https://twitter.com/forgetmebot/status/799943416423575552

The key here is to remember that the same solutions do not apply to all cases.  That is why pre-teaching around metacognition and student success is crucial.  The meaning of what success looks like for each student must be considered by both parents, students and teachers alike.  It may also mean that it is not simply those with physical or mental disabilities that have need of assistance.  These assistive technologies may mean something as simple as a pair of glasses for someone with poor vision or as complex as speech to text software for those who cannot speak.  Students often want to try some of the technologies to see if they fit with their needs.  However, I always make it clear that a person doesn’t wear glasses or hearing aids if they weren’t needed.  In the same way, evaluation of needs for learning supports is critical.  As we seek to help evaluate which students are in need of which specific aids, it is paramount that we keep in mind that not only should we as teachers seek to find tools but also to break down unjust barriers to enhance student success.    equity

Photo Credit

For example, it is not possible to remove someone’s inability to walk, however, we can remove barriers that keep that student from achieving.  Whereas equality provides the same supports for everyone, equity is much more fluid.  It encompasses anyone and everyone who may need a little help.  As Naomi states, the biggest barriers to successful AT integration are access and training.  Natalie also points out the need for PD on this subject as many teachers have little or no training and LRT’s are stretched thin.  In the video below, Sam is able to attend college classes and even take his own notes using his Ipad and computer.  Were Sam to have been born in another century, he would certainly not have access to these sorts of opportunities.  The world has been opened in an unprecedented way and the future will surely only continue to give freedom to those in need of some sort of assistance.  Sam can now feel like he can contribute and manage his own learning.

Those with extreme disabilities are in no way different from others.  As is mentioned by Henry Evans in the video below, if we both want to go 60 kph, we will both need a piece of assistive technology called a car.  Therefore it is also important to remember that assistive technology is not a sign of weakness or a problem.  Those who struggle to complete certain tasks have been ‘othered’ by society for long enough and by constantly keeping them down, we reassign power to those in the centre.  Unfortunately, it is often because of assistive technologies that students are viewed as different, strange or weird.  Because they are often very visible, it is crucial to have meaningful conversations with students at the outset about how we each learn in different ways and what equity looks like in the classroom.  I usually begin each year with these types of discussions for that very reason.  Not only does it help each student to take part in some self-reflection about their own learning style, it also allows us to discuss the ways in which we support one another as a learning community.

It will be an exciting time for students in the coming years.  Technology will allow those who have been previously marginalized to not only participate but also to thrive in our classrooms and in society.  I often have to repeatedly reevaluate my practice keeping in mind the various needs that exist in my classroom.  I still struggle with this and I wonder what tech tools or practices exist that allow teachers to plan with student success in mind?  What is the best way to implement these strategies?  Should we still be considering learning styles when we talk about AT?  Let me know in the comments section below.

Disconnect to Reconect

reconnect

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It is surprising to think that the little devices we carry with us have such a hold on us.  We constantly check in on our Facebook accounts, take photos, post them and check for likes and shares.  Very few of us go without cell phones for more than a few minutes let alone a few days.  The concept of unplugging has become a bit of a buzz word these days and the concept has been explored by tech wizards and numerous blogs.  Unplugging or detoxing has been lauded for it’s merits as an activity to cleanse the mind and the soul.  But is it all it’s cracked up to be?  Is it necessary to unplug when everything we do is linked to tech and social media?  Life is about finding balance and it just seems as though in the fight between screen time and living in the moment, screens are winning by a long shot.

be there

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The reality is that it’s actually healthy to take breaks from social media and technology from time to time.  Many studies have shown that cognitive function and memory are affected by constant social media checking and idle web surfing.  The brain is like a muscle.  Although it doesn’t move, it does require time to develop and grow after new information is added.  We could consider this processing time.  In fact, studies have shown that taking a break from screens and tech periodically can recharge the brain and improve memory.  Here are some other interesting stats…

  • 84% of cell phone users claim they could not go a single day without their device. (source)
  • 67% of cell phone owners check their phone for messages, alerts, or calls — even when they don’t notice their phone ringing or vibrating.(source)
  • Studies indicate some mobile device owners check their devices every 6.5 minutes. (source)
  • 88% of U.S. consumers use mobile devices as a second screen even while watching television. (source)
  • Almost half of cell owners have slept with their phone next to their bed because they wanted to make sure they didn’t miss any calls. (source)
  • Traditional TV viewing eats up over six days (144 hours, 54 minutes) worth of time per month. (source)
  • Some researchers have begun labeling “cell phone checking” as the new yawn because of its contagious nature. (source)

unplug

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I think we’ve all experienced situations such as the ones mentioned during the debate by Dean, Janelle, and Kyle.  I still find it incredibly rude when someone is in the middle of a conversation and the other person pulls out his/her phone.  As stated above, you may have even compulsively pulled out your phone when you saw someone else doing it (much like yawns being contagious).  Now I am not saying that I am without reproach in this regard.  I too carry my phone with me almost all of the time.  I do try to keep it in my pocket when in social situations and having kids has really opened my eyes to the dangers of not living in the moment.  I have been at countless swimming lessons, soccer games and play dates during which not a single parent was actually engaging with their kids or watching them at all.  What could distract these parents from watching their 3 year olds having a blast in the pool or scoring a goal?  As I look around the field or pool deck I consistently see moms and dads hunched over cell phones and tablets, unaware of what’s happening around them.  I am not in a place to judge at all.  Maybe these parents are responding to urgent emails.  Maybe they are preparing something for work the next day.  But, I can imagine that at least some of these parents are engaged in social media activities.  Here is another viewpoint on unplugging shared by a teenager named Lane Sutton, a tech and social media wonderkind.

So, I practice being in the moment.  I make a concerted effort to be in every story, joke or activity with my kids because they are such little sponges.  They notice what we may not always perceive.  My little girl said to me the other day, “Daddy put your phone away and come outside with me.”  She’s 2 and she is already realizing that with my phone in front of me she does not have my full attention.  I realize that we will never be able to denounce technology.  It is now too ingrained in our lives.  Social media has a stranglehold on the way in which we interact with the world.  Even my 87 year-old Grandmother checks her Facebook profile on her Ipad daily to see pictures of her grandchildren and great grandchildren.  The key has to be moderation.  Take some time this week to take a break from social media and screens and take part in an activity you love without posting the results or waiting for likes.  Enjoy the smiles on the faces of your family members without snapping a photo.  Get some exercise without posting your workout to social media or fitness apps.  You’ll find rejuvenation of mind, body and soul.

Here are some other great reasons to unplug:

1) Leave behind jealousy, envy, and loneliness

2) Combat FOMO (Fear of Missing Out)

3) Find solitude (there is value in having alone time)

4) Life is happening right in front of you (don’t miss out for FOMO)

5) Promote Creation over Consumption (take time to create something)

6) Once the device is gone the level of addiction can truly be understood (as we all know when we have forgotten our phones)

7) Life is about flesh, blood and eye contact

Everything in moderation, as someone once said.

-Almost everything will work again if you unplug for a few minutes….Including you!-  Anne Lamott

 

 

 

 

 

Is Social Media Making us Unsocial?

Growing up in the 21st century means that childhood is defined by, and inextricably linked to, social media.  Children as young as grade 2 or 3 now have personal devices.  Children in elementary and middle school have multiple social media accounts even though many of these require minimum ages of 13 or 14.  It has become a way to connect, to chat, to post our thoughts, feelings and emotions.  It provides answers to questions, gives feedback, and affirms or negates our feelings.  It acts like a catalog of all the information available to us which is shared by others.  It documents our lives in incredible detail if need be.  Social media helps students connect with other students across the globe, collaborate together, post progress and receive feedback.  It is a force of the 21st century world and it is a crucial part of our lives that cannot be ignored.

one does not simply

However, can we accept blindly every new app and innovation that comes along without knowing how they impact us?  Of course we should right?  I mean, technology is always good, it always moves us forward, it always makes life easier and simpler.  After-all, many of today’s modern conveniences were once new inventions as well.  The difference here lies in the deeply personal aspects of these social media platforms.

As Alison Graham explains, the goals of social media platforms are connections and socialization but it seems that the more we participate, the less social we actually become. Personalized technology that becomes so ingrained in our psyches that we literally become addicted to the likes that somehow indicate we have worth in this world.  Herein lies the problem, with the blind acceptance of social media platforms, it shifts focus away from others and onto the self.  As time goes on, the socializing aspect for which the apps were designed ceases to be the true driving force behind their use.  The self often becomes the true reason for the constant posting and checking for likes.  One researcher even tells of a young man who’s desire to take the perfect selfie drove him to suicidal tendencies.   It tends to drive narcissism to the point where phycological trauma can occur.

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People will argue that these anxieties have always existed and that alarmists are making too much of what we call social media addictions.  When I was growing up, social time with friends was just that…time to socialize.  Talking and laughing about what had happened that day, riding our bikes to another friend’s house to see if we could organize a soccer game.  Some would argue that we look back at our childhood through rose coloured glasses in which we see a delightful world free of stress and anxiety.  Of course stress and anxiety still existed before the age of social media.  However, the difference lies in transparency of lives lived completely in the online environment. If your social status, well being, and self worth comes completely from what is said about you on social media, it’s little wonder that students can not handle being without their phones.  A recent CNN documentary called #Being 13 looked at 13 year olds across the United States and their lives lived on social media.

  • 61% of teens said they wanted to see if their online posts are getting likes and comments.
  • 36% of teens said they wanted to see if their friends are doing things without them.
  • 21% of teens said they wanted to make sure no one was saying mean things about them.

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The Huffington Post released a study in which parents were asked if children were more susceptible to mental health problems in this day and age.  The results indicated that social media was one of the driving forces behind mental health issues for youth.  This is something that cannot be escaped whether it’s negative feedback on a selfie, bullying comments posted on your Facebook wall, or being left out of a group of friends.  The digital online life follows students back to the privacy of their homes each night. Compulsively checking and rechecking to see what others have said about them has become normal for many teens.  This new phenomenon, which has been deemed lurking,  tends to lead to late night with little sleep as students scroll through feeds, answer texts or hit like and follow to show that they are “socially engaged” in popular culture.

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So what does this all mean?  First of all, as adults in a digital world it once again comes back to the idea of modelling proper social media use.  What warrants a post or picture being placed online?  Who will we allow to see it?  What message are we trying to convey with this content?  I always ask my students to THINK before they post anything.

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Secondly, it’s important to set limits for social media use.  This falls on the shoulders of the parents but it is something that can be discussed at school as well.  Have students reflect meaningfully on how much they are online.  What are they doing during those hours and are they balancing for a healthy lifestyle that involves enough sleep and exercise?  It’s perhaps unfair to compare our childhood with the one in which students now find themselves.  However, it is more than fair to help students find a balanced and healthy approach to life.